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Kulajda, the traditional Czech soup

Kulajda, the traditional Czech soup

people icon For 4 euro icon € 1.09 /pers. calories icon 200 kcal/100g

Ingredients

  • 250 g onions
  • 40 ml apple or wine vinegar
  • A bay leaf
  • Cumin seeds
  • 4 eggs
  • 500 ml sour cream
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 250 g of special potatoes for cooking
  • A bunch of fresh dill
  • 250 g of mushrooms or your favorite mushrooms (dried or freeze-dried would also work)
  • Water
  • Salt (to the taste of each house)
  • Optional: 4 free-range eggs (to poach, one per person).

The Czech Republic is a country worth exploring from top to bottom . Cities like Prague, Karlovy Vary, Cesky Krumlov or Lednice are authentic paradises full of art and history where getting lost in their streets means finding idyllic corners and hidden treasures.

It is a country to which we owe a lot, since they were the inventors of “Pilsner” beer , the most consumed in the world. The Czechs have a long beer tradition, they even surpass Spain in annual beer consumption , and look, we make it difficult for them.

But it is also an area where it is very cold, and its gastronomy has been adapting to be able to withstand these low temperatures. It is one of the countries where the most meat is consumed, and dishes such as roast knuckle , sauerkraut or goulash can be found anywhere. But to warm up well, there’s nothing like a good soup , which is why they have a lot of variety.

The soup recipe that we bring you today is the best known in the entire country , kulajda or Czech dill soup . It is a traditional recipe, one of those traditional ones that can be found in any Czech restaurant and home. And being traditional, as you can imagine, it is addictive. It has a different flavor than what we are used to here, but it will surely not disappoint you, and it is very easy to make, so there is no excuse not to dare to do it.

This soup can also be found in several Central European countries such as Hungary and Slovakia. They are countries that have shared a common history and their customs and traditions are very similar, but the original recipe arose in Bohemia , a region that today belongs to the Czech Republic.

Preparation of the Kulajda

  1. First we chop the onion and the mushrooms or seasonal mushrooms that we want to use into small pieces (you can chop them into small squares or thinly sliced ​​ones) and sauté them lightly, without the onion becoming too golden. Once we have it, we add a bay leaf, cumin and salt and sauté over low heat.
  2. Then we add the vinegar and bring it to a boil to reduce. Once we have it, we add the sour cream and whole milk. Meanwhile, peel and cut the potatoes into cubes and add them to the mixture.
  3. We let everything cook until the potato is soft and, when it is, we add the dill and let it rest for a few minutes.
  4. If we want to give the soup more presence, we can add a poached egg when serving it. We heat water in a saucepan. Crack the egg into a cup and set aside.
  5. When the water is about to boil (or boils slightly), we swirl it with the help of a spoon or some whisks. We drop the egg into the center of the swirl, delicately. We cook 3 minutes. We remove with a slotted spoon, and salt to taste. The egg white will be solid but not completely curdled, and the yolk will be liquid inside.
  6. We put it on top of the bowl and serve. Ready to enjoy the Czech Republic in your own home.

Tips for a perfect kulajda

  • It is usually prepared with seasonal mushrooms or mushrooms. But if you want to give it your own style, you can also add dried or freeze-dried mushrooms. When soaking them and then using them in soup, don’t even think about throwing away the water, it would be a sin. You add it to the soup to achieve greater flavor.
  • If we can’t find dill or we don’t like the flavor it leaves, we can replace it with tarragon, chives or parsley .
  • Kulajda is a thick soup , very similar to a cream, we should not be scared if with milk and sour cream it becomes thicker than a normal soup.

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